ClimbSci

ClimbSci is an evidence-based webcast covering scientific topics related to climbing and climbers, notably nutrition, training, recovery, and performance. Hosted by Brian Rigby (Climbing Nutrition), and Tom Herbert (usefulcoach).

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Episode 07 - Recovery - Part 2

In the seventh episode of ClimbSci, we continue the topic of recovery, and discuss what practical strategies you can implement to recover best. We also answer some listener questions.

If you have any questions or comments regarding the show, want us to investigate something specifically, or know any guests we should interview; please leave them in the YouTube comments, or head over to Brian’s page facebook/climbingnutrition and leave them on the wall.



Bibliography

All studies below were specifically cited in this episode. In general, if a study was not cited in the episode, we do not cite it here—even if we base a claim on it or similar studies. Expertise is a culmination of the time spent studying a topic, and it is not always practical to fully cite the research that has informed our professional opinion. If you have a question regarding the source of a specific claim we make, please contact us.

  • Aragon, A. A., & Schoenfeld, B. J. (2013). Nutrient timing revisited: is there a post-exercise anabolic window? Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition, 10(1), 5. http://doi.org/10.1186/1550-2783-10-5
  • Kerksick, C. M., Arent, S., Schoenfeld, B. J., Stout, J. R., Campbell, B., Wilborn, C. D., … Antonio, J. (2017). International society of sports nutrition position stand: nutrient timing. Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition, 14(1). http://doi.org/10.1186/s12970-017-0189-4
  • Herbert, T. (2016). Heart Rate Variability (HRV) for Training and Recovery. https://useful.coach/articles/heart-rate-variability-hrv-for-training-and-recovery/
  • Brown, F., Gissane, C., Howatson, G., van Someren, K., Pedlar, C., & Hill, J. (2017). Compression Garments and Recovery from Exercise: A Meta-Analysis. Sports Medicine, 47(11), 2245–2267. http://doi.org/10.1007/s40279-017-0728-9
  • Dupuy, O., Douzi, W., Theurot, D., Bosquet, L., & Dugué, B. (2018). An Evidence-Based Approach for Choosing Post-exercise Recovery Techniques to Reduce Markers of Muscle Damage, Soreness, Fatigue, and Inflammation: A Systematic Review With Meta-Analysis. Frontiers in Physiology, 9. http://doi.org/10.3389/fphys.2018.00403
  • Watts PB, Daggett M, Gallagher P, Wilkins B. Metabolic response during sport rock climbing and the effects of active versus passive recovery. Int J Sports Med. 2000;21(3):185-190.
  • Arciero PJ. (2001). Comparison of creatine ingestion and resistance training on energy expenditure and limb blood flow.

Additional

  • Baldwin AC E al. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory therapy after eccentric exercise in healthy older individuals. - PubMed - NCBI. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11487604. Accessed June 27, 2018.
  • Draper N, Bird EL, Coleman I, Hodgson C. Effects of Active Recovery on Lactate Concentration, Heart Rate and RPE in Climbing. J Sports Sci Med. 2006;5(1):97-105.
  • Heyman E, DE Geus B, Mertens I, Meeusen R. Effects of four recovery methods on repeated maximal rock climbing performance. Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2009;41(6):1303-1310.
  • McLeay Y, Barnes MJ, Mundel T, Hurst SM, Hurst RD, Stannard SR. Effect of New Zealand blueberry consumption on recovery from eccentric exercise-induced muscle damage. J Int Soc Sports Nutr. 2012;9(1):19.
  • Merrick MA, Jutte LS, Smith ME. Cold Modalities With Different Thermodynamic Properties Produce Different Surface and Intramuscular Temperatures. J Athl Train. 2003;38(1):28.
  • Merry TL, Ristow M. Do antioxidant supplements interfere with skeletal muscle adaptation to exercise training? J Physiol. 2016;594(18):5135-5147.
  • Trappe TA, White F, Lambert CP, Cesar D, Hellerstein M, Evans WJ. Effect of ibuprofen and acetaminophen on postexercise muscle protein synthesis. American Journal of Physiology-Endocrinology and Metabolism. 2002;282(3):E551-E556.


People

Brian Rigby

Brian Rigby is a climber, sports nutritionist, and writer; he’s not so bad at handstands, either. He is the author behind Climbing Nutrition, a blog that aims to improve climbers’ understanding of how nutrition affects performance and help them climb better. Brian lives in Boulder, Colorado with his wife and two dogs, has a master of science in applied clinical nutrition, and is a certified (CISSN) sports nutritionist through the International Society for Sports Nutrition.

Climbing Nutrition / fb:climbingnutrition

Tom Herbert

Tom Herbert (aka “usefulcoach”) when not working full-time as a GNU/Linux System Administrator, works as a freelance strength and conditioning coach, and performance and change nutritionist certified (CISSN) through the International Society of Sports Nutrition. Based in London UK, Tom works with a number of Team GB climbers, enjoys bouldering, pole dancing (doing not watching), long walks, longer sentences, and is a serial user of the Oxford comma.

usefulcoach / fb:usefulcoach / @usefulcoach